Summary Of Essay Beauty By Susan Sontag

Structure In “A Woman's Beauty” By Susan Sontag

In Sontag’s “A Woman’s Beauty” the structure the author uses for the story has a dramatic impact on the readers. In the story, Sontag structures the essay base on many historical events and other religious ideas to support her idea, how a woman sometime is only judge by her appearance. Specifically, Sontag uses three ideas in the story to support her argument. First is in history what the Greeks believe in a woman’s beauty. Second, Sontag discuss about how the Christian religion plays a major role in shaping how a woman is judge only base on her beauty. In the end, Sontag talks about in today’s society how woman are still judge by her beauty. However, in the end Sontag mentions how the society should stop judging a woman only base on her beauty.
In the beginning, Sontag structures the history on what the Greeks believe about a woman’s beauty. Base on what Sontag describes, the Greeks believe if a woman is beautiful in the outside, she must be really beautiful in the inside as well, in this quote “If it did occur to the Greeks to distinguish between a person’s “inside” and “outside,” they still expected that inner beauty would be matched by beauty of the other kind.” (Sontag 15) in this quote Sontag talks about how the Greeks believe if a woman is pretty in the outside, she must be a good person inside. Moreover, after the discussion about what the Greeks believe in history, Sontag compares that idea to today’s society. “We not only split off – with the greatest facility – the “inside” from the “outside”, but we are actually surprised when someone who is beautiful is also intelligent, talented, good.” (Sontag 15) in this quote Sontag outlines the fact that in today’s society we believe the opposite, where we will be surprise if we find a pretty woman and she’s still intelligent, talented and good in the side. This tells the readers, that Sontag wants to use this to show the readers that in today’s society, we no longer judge people base only on their outer appearance. This is a very controversial topic because the Greek belief is very bias. This idea plays a great hook, since this idea draws readers’ interest to find out what the rest of the story has to offer. ...

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In reading Susan Sontag’s “A Woman’s Beauty”, she explains that women think they have an obligation to be beautiful and that they consider how they look more important than who they are. Sontag also adds that women are sometimes obsessed with their outer beauty that they lose sight of their inner beauty. Fashion and the Media both have taken outer beauty way too far for women. In this society today, women are more pressured by other women on how they look. Women judge other women about their looks but men don’t do the same, because it is considered” unmanly” as Sontag states. Women naturally try to be appropriate and beautiful to attract men. Unfortunately, they have gone to very high levels of obsession with themselves that they lost track of their purpose of being beautiful and their position in this society. Sontag also argues that women at the same time have the idea in their minds that being beautiful will earn them a certain reputation and place in society, and that beauty brings power and success.

Even young women grow up have these same ideas in their minds and according to Sontag, “they are taught to see their bodies in parts and to evaluate each part separately”. In modern days beauty is administered as a form of self-oppression. In the process of growing up, young women may forget how intelligent they are and their goals in life. According to some people who have been surveyed about women’s success in the society, good looks are a great advantage in many areas of life. Let’s go back to the point that women try to make themselves beautiful to attract the best men possible.

Women forget that beauty is also the power to attract. In women’s view, men come in whole packages together with being handsome and successful. On the other hand, men just want just want healthy and decent women with good personality. Susag Sontag’s essay is indeed very accurate in revealing some important facts about women’s beauty and the way the society looks at women. The world is not a beauty pageant where every woman has to look perfect. There are many people that think that beauty is more important, but there are also people that feel that a woman with a good head and personality will get than based on just looks alone. It is a fact that beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and everyone has their own view on what’s beautiful to them.

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